Category Archives: Charts and Patterns

These are more advanced charting techniques; learn how to identify and exploit chart patterns

Descending Triangle

The descending triangle is a bearish continuation pattern. This pattern forms two converging lines. The initial is a downward slant which resistance and the other is a horizontal support. To validate the descending triangle, there must be oscillation between the two lines. The lines must be touched at least twice for validation.

Symmetrical Triangle Top

The symmetrical triangle top is a bullish continuation pattern. This pattern forms two trend lines which are symmetrical to the horizontal and convergent. The initial pattern is a bearish slant that gives resistance and the other is a bullish slant that will be the support. To prove a symmetrical triangle top, one must have oscillation between the two lines. Each of these lines must be touched at least twice for validation.

Symmetrical Triangle Bottom

A symmetrical triangle bottom is a bearish continuation pattern. This pattern forms two trend lines that are symmetrical to the horizontal and convergent. The initial one is a bearish slant that gives support and the other will be a bullish slant that will create a resistance. To prove a symmetrical triangle bottom there must have oscillation between the two lines. Each line has to touch at least twice for validation.

Ascending Triangle

The ascending triangle is a bullish continuation pattern. This pattern is made by two converging lines. The first line is an upward slant which is the support and the other is a horizontal resistance line. To validate the ascending triangle, there has to be an oscillation between the two lines. Each line has to be Read More…

Cup and Saucer

The cup with handle has a continuous pattern. This pattern is formed by two rounded bottoms, the first is deeper and wider than the second. The height of the cup and the handle will be aligned along a straight horizontal resistance. This is the neckline of the pattern.

Rounding Top

The rounding top pattern is a reverse U-shape, also called a “reverse saucer. ” The top is rounded with a flat top. But as you’ll see in many cases there are several bullish peaks and they will not put in question the validity of the pattern.

Rounding Bottom

The U-shaped bottom is a rounding bottom, also called a “saucer. ” The dip is rounded with a flat bottom. But we’ll see in many cases there are several bearish peaks, but they do not question the validity of that pattern.

Pennant

The pennant resembles the symmetrical triangle, but it’s characteristics are not the same. The pennants is shaped like a wedge of consolidation. Its normally appears after a sudden upward or downward movement. The life of a pennant is short according to the time frame used.

Symmetrical Broadening Top

The symmetrical broadening top is called a bullish continuation pattern. This pattern is formed by two symmetrical horizontal lines that are divergent. It looks like an inverted symmetrical triangle or an open triangle. The oscillations in the middle of the two bands of the triangle are consequently becoming more and more sizable. Each line has to touch at least twice for validation.

Descending Flag

The descending flag shows as a continuation pattern. The flag is built by two straight downward parallel lines which is shaped like a rectangle. It is oriented in the direction of that trend which it consolidates. Contrary to a bearish channel, this pattern is quite short term and shows the fact that buyers will need a break.

Ascending Flag

An ascending flag is a continuation pattern. The ascending flag is formed by two straight upward parallel lines which are shaped like a rectangle. It is adjusted in the direction of the trend that it consolidates. Contrary to a bullish channel, this pattern is quite short term and marks the fact the seller will need a break.

Bullish Channel

A bullish channel is called a continuation trend pattern. The bullish channel is assembled by two parallel lines that frame the upward price trend. A line is validated when there has been at least two points of contact with the price. The more contact points it has, the stronger the trend line is and the more their breakout will give a strong sell signal.

Bearish Channel

A bearish channel is a continuation trend pattern. The bearish channel is arranged by two parallel lines that frame the downward price trend. To certify a line, there has to be at least two points of contact with the price. The more contact points it has, the more the trend line is stronger and their breakout will give a stronger buy signal.

Triple Top

The triple top is a bearish pattern with an MN shape. Three bottoms will come in succession, reflecting an important resistance. This marks a reversal will.

Reverse Head and Shoulders

Reverse head and shoulders is a trend reversal pattern. It will mark a desire to make a bullish reversal. The theory is the same as a triple bottom other than the second bottom will be lower than the others, which are technically at the same height. The reverse head and shoulders pattern will be formed by three bottoms that will succeed.

Symmetrical Broadening Bottom

The symmetrical broadening bottom is called a bullish reversal pattern. This pattern is formulated by two symmetrical horizontal lines that are divergent. It is an inverted symmetrical triangle or looks like an open triangle. The oscillations between the two bands of the triangle are consequently becoming more sizable. Each line has to be touched at least twice for a validation.

Double Top

The double top is a bearish pattern shaped like an M. Two tops must succeed, imaging an important resistance. This marks a reversal. The pattern may also be in WV shape. We can consider a triple top as well.

Double Bottom

The double bottom is a bullish pattern indicated by a W shape. The two bottoms will succeed, mirroring an important support (in green). This will mark a reversal will. The pattern may also be in a WV shape. We’ll discuss a triple bottom.